Blocked at the Border

It was a case of stepping out in faith with ten thousand hours preparation. It’s been an ongoing burden of the LORD in my heart for some time now to visit the church fellowship in Sydney some 3800 kilometres away. COVID regulations meant that they hadn’t gathered for Sabbath worship since May last year. Thus I left Western Australia by motorcycle [still unable to fly there] on 20th February 2022 having planned this trip for several months.

I cherished those three weeks spent in Sydney, in weekly worship and fellowship. There were numerous café catchups. Sydney has good coffee! God blessed me in so many ways; in fact, all my prayers in every way were answered. I had prayed for four specific things: safety, favour, health and providence. During the first week of torrential rains, work was more restrictive to indoors, and then having to vacate accommodation because of COVID; otherwise all worked well.

I left Sydney almost a week ago, staying the first night in Braidwood NSW, then Robinvale VIC and then at Kimba SA. This is now where my testimony begins:

A long ride from Kimba where I stayed last night to Border Village on the Eyre Highway. Throughout this trip there have been numerous favourable moments; people who showed extraordinary kindness. Like the lady at the motel in Robinvale who was simply extraordinarily helpful in finding alternate accommodation.

I was grateful to have had tail winds all day. The bike used less fuel, and the riding was easier. I experienced head winds and a dust storm on the Hay Plains days earlier, so I was grateful for favourable wind. Late in the afternoon, I noticed two foreboding storm clouds in the direction I was riding. But, in both instances, the storm downpour was to the right, and though the road in place was wet, I only got a faint drizzle at one stage.

But arriving at Border Village was a different story. I had been meditating on what it might look like and what I might say to the police checkpoint, as Western Australia still has a “hard state border” that up until recently prevented most traffic from passing. As I approached the border checkpoint, a scripture came to mind, “Don’t meditate on what you’re going to say, for the Lord will give it to you in that very hour.” That notion in itself made me feel at ease, as earlier I had noted to a friend that my heart would probably be pounding in anticipation on arrival at the border.

Thankfully the policeman who met me was empathetic but firm, saying I could not cross into Western Australia. “Ride back to find a doctor who can give you a medical exemption; if you camp out at night don’t get cold.”

Thus I wondered what to do. Another scripture came to mind as I contemplated my next step. “Stand still and see the salvation of the Lord.” I didn’t know what that would mean in this narrative, or what I should next do or not do. So I stood loitering there about ten metres from the police checkpoint. I stood there for a long time, returning later with a chewy bar and some water. What do I do now? The thought seemed to reoccur, “Stand still and see the salvation of the Lord.”

I stood for several hours outside the quarantine/police checkpoint, only to finally have an unfriendly sergeant tell me to move on. He was a complex, unsympathetic and unkind man. He didn’t buy into the compassionate, helpful and caring scenario. He especially didn’t seem to like religious folk. He refused my offer to join in prayer together. I mentioned that there is State Law, Federal Law and Divine Law. I noted that Federal Law states that all Australians have freedom of movement between states, which he acknowledged. I said, “You and I are brothers.” “No we’re not,” he retorted. In the conversation, his aggressive stance seemed ready for an arrest – there was nothing redemptive or reconciling about his demeanor or attitude. Another sergeant just stood there and from his body language seemed baffled and unconvinced (perhaps even in their role of what they were actually doing there.) Yet the first police officer I encountered on arrival did exhibit a common decency and concern. God does grant favour.

In our energetic and somewhat confrontational conversation with the sergeant, I told him that “one day every knee would bow to Jesus.” He said that his religion was to himself and so should mine be. What really left him rattled was when I said, “One day Jesus will call your name from the grave.” At that moment he seemed as if he momentarily lost his train of thought. Again he threatened what arrest might look like. I explained that as I work for the International Ministerial Congress, that wasn’t an option, and left peaceably. As I left with the bike to organise a cabin for the night, the first police officer I encountered waved to me and shouted, “Safe riding.” Then when I went to buy a bottle of water, I encountered him again as he was there getting a coffee, and he acknowledged that I was staying the night.

Stand still and see the salvation of the Lord.” Still not clear where to proceed. But to witness the gospel message in the name of Jesus at the police checkpoint with the two sergeants there was an honour and privilege. “The word will be given to you in that very hour.”

I was so brain-and-body tired, but this time on a deeper level. It was a hard afternoon. I really appreciate the rallying of the brothers and sisters in Christ who are joining in prayer across Australia and even overseas. I appreciated hearing Rebecca’s cheerful voice over the phone.

I’m now getting lots of messages from across the world. Some of my responses:

It’s a strange peculiarity creating a hard border that excludes the philanthropic accommodation of those who have made a personal informed decision not to take the COVID vaccine or to disclose their personal medical details. Please pray.

I’ve been on the road for some 30 or so  hours, riding 8 hours each day. There is no option for turning back, but that God grant favour and opportunity from His divine repository. We need the congregations of the saints to uphold this in prayer. Thanks Mike

Thank you for PRAYERS. I often preach about faith, talk about faith, retell the great Biblical stories of faith and encourage others to have faith; now is the day to humbly stand in that moment. Sometimes all we need to do is to, “Stand still and see the salvation of the LORD.”

Continued below:

Sometimes it’s hard to see the silver lining when treading the difficult path. What do I do standing in no-man’s-land? A man of God, now a sojourner, unable to return home. My wife Rebecca some 14 hours away by road anticipating me coming home soon, but I’m blocked by an authoritarian, unscientific political narrative. I had wrongly presumed that the checkpoint would have had a COVID testing station. After all, the Government website informed travellers to bring their own Rapid Antigen Tests. I had bought a pack of six at a pharmacy in Sydney, just in case. But, there was no testing procedure. We now know that the vaccinated are just as contagious as the unvaccinated, so a testing mechanism at the border would have been a genuine complement to the State Government’s health emergency powers. It was conspicuously not. One can only conclude that the current WA policies are about control and exclusion, nothing more.

As the sun was setting, I decided to continue praying, and began to also think it might also be a time to fast. I’ve certainly lost some kilos on this trip; stress does reduce appetite.

I eventually checked into a motel at Border Village, and had a troubled night, my body inexplicably trembling from the stress. Again a Biblical theme pressed into my mind during the night. It was as if, again, “the word of the Lord came to me.” The thought persisted during the night of when a fleeing Elijah was fearful of his life. King Ahab sought to kill him too. Elijah was confused, felt alone, defeated and overwhelmed. Hiding in a cave, an angel of the Lord came and said to him [the paraphrase going around in my mind], “Eat, gain some strength, for the journey ahead of you is long.

In rehearsing and pondering that scripture, I realised that now wasn’t the time to fast. That can happen later. If I were to ride the bike, especially maintaining control at very low speeds, I needed physical strength. (The first things to feel the stress from fasting are my weakened legs!) “Eat, you need the strength, for great is the journey ahead of you,” was the recurring theme in my head.

Thankfully I had some munchy bars and water, and felt somewhat in a better state of mind. Talking to Rebecca on the phone brought out a well-spring of tears and for a few minutes the choked incapacity to speak. Sometimes we get tested to the very maximum!

The short story is that the following morning, I took the phone counsel of two very different options. One qualified “good” advice was to ignore the police checkpoint and ride straight into Western Australia. At Norseman, the police would stop me, arrest me, issue a heavy fine, with then the scenario of a court case in Kalgoorlie. The source told me that others had been “successful” with getting back home to Western Australia this way. I spent some 25 minutes on the phone asking a variety of questions about the details of the pending operation. It seemed that it would be the only way to get home. After all, the Western Australia police were actually acting on South Australian soil, a mitigating technicality that could be presented in court.

So what do I do? I felt the stress like I’ve never experienced before. So I sought additional counsel from pastor Phil in Adelaide. We discussed what the potential news headlines would look like: WA COG7 PASTOR ARRESTED…” It would reflect badly on our part of the body of Christ, the church. The harder option would be to turn around and ride back the 16 hours to Adelaide. I’d rather suffer for righteousness and in the name of Jesus, (and not for my rights) than be tempted to find the quicker way home. It was a hard choice but one what was clear enough to me.

Thus I saddled up the bike, and quietly headed east again, on a road terribly familiar but one filled with tears. Again, I’d rather suffer for righteousness sake, than play by the devil’s rules. Then the word of the Lord sounded again, “For long is the road ahead of you.” I somehow understood.

Even a day’s journey begins to see events in their bigger perspective. Let’s go back a few years. When I was ordained as pastor, both anointing pastors prayed. The first pastor prayed for an out-pouring and anointing of the Holy Spirit. The second pastor prayed for strength for all the things “John would suffer in the name of Jesus”. The second prayer piqued my attention for reasons different from the first prayer. I’ve often wondered how that suffering might evolve, what it might consist of and the circumstances therein? I’ve tasted some of it now, and so has my wife Rebecca.

We are now sadly living in a post-Christian culture. The anchors and vestiges of morality and compassion are virtues quickly receding into past memory. I see that so clearly. The question remains: what will it take for return, repentance and reconciliation? Maybe there’s a harder and longer road ahead.

And, finally, what is the word that I keep hearing from above? “Blessed are those who put their trust in the LORD.

John Classic
By John Classic

One Small Step…

Each journey begins with one small step, often by faith into the unknown and unexplored, and desirably with ten thousand hours preparation! We’re not alone in this, surrounded by family and friends, and watched over from above. Our prayers for each other are the touchstone of community.

And in our “Amen and Alleluias” our reliance is established on His divine providence and favour – a grace unmerited but afforded nonetheless. I’m looking forward to the richness of shared fellowship amidst the current uncertainties. Let’s keep upholding each other in prayer, reflecting a divine glory in all we say and do!

PS Looking forward to keeping you posted on the travels, people, opportunities, challenges and aspirations along the way, travelling from Perth to Sydney.

John Classic
By John Classic

With All Alacrity

Eyes fixed not on the storm but on Jesus and on him alone.

Baptised in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ.

Another year is over, and we’ve enjoyed the challenge of further researching and developing gospel content that speaks into the issues of this generation. From the perspective of what has been accomplished in the past by Jesus and what remains yet to be seen as the scriptures indicate, we have significant work yet remaining. The gruesome death and literal bodily resurrection of Jesus sets the stage for all we aspire to.

Based on this, our forward-looking approach is also inspired by the distinct promises and assurances that Jesus now gives. He assures us that he will never leave or forsake us. That he will dwell with and in us. That his words will come from our mouths, and as such our testimony remains. That in this world we’ll experience hostility, adversity, suffering, trial and tribulation – realities for which we’re encouraged to rejoice and face with all alacrity! Why and how? Because it ends well. There is hope. There is reason, purpose, morality and objective identity. And so whatever 2022 holds, we’re unafraid of whatever the path ahead bodes because we’re faith filled – eyes fixed not on the storm but on Jesus and on him alone.

We’re planning another motorcycle ride from Perth to Sydney, filming along the way, sharing the gospel with fellow travellers and sojourners, as well as visiting those in Christ scattered across this great continent. Our goal is to have a freshly printed 6th edition of Resurrection HOPE which we’ll again promote along the way. Seven years ago we gave away 48 copies of this Christ-centred book. This 6th edition features a new introductory chapter. May God grant us courage, grace, favour and opportunity in sharing the best good news message we could ever hear!

John Classic
By John Classic

Looking Ahead

How do we adequately prepare for what’s ahead – either the immediate future or the long-term horizon view? It is without doubt that those who have a Biblically-based broad-brushstroke narrative and trajectory of “certain hope” focused on Jesus are in a good place to pioneer whatever lies ahead.

We believe that we’re created in God’s image and likeness. We believe that life, therefore, has meaning and purpose. In other words, that suffering also has some kind of larger, transcendent context. We identify as God’s offspring, His children. We cherish that we’re loved so much, and often marvel that such a great price has been paid in our redemption (in Jesus). We hold dear that Jesus is coming again, in glory, might and power. And, from those scriptures, we also become cognisant that His coming will be preceded by a time “that has never happened before nor will ever happen again”.

We can easily become immersed, for example, in the descriptive narrative throughout Matthew 24 and Luke 21, as well as ponder the rich imagery throughout Revelation, each contributing to a broad-brushstroke array of the events at the end of this age and the heralding of the new.

The Lord has revealed just enough for us to know and all that we need for today. Of course, none of us particularly relish facing what appear to be increasingly difficult times. Here we’re comforted by Jesus words:

“Many are the afflictions of the righteous.”

“In this world you will have tribulation,” says Jesus, “but be of good cheer. I have overcome the world.”

The notion of suffering for Christ begins with Jesus’ teachings and proceeds throughout the apostolic letters. The question, of course, is how are we ever going to adequately negotiate these times – given that the past 70 or so years in the West at least since World War 2 has been relatively peaceful, abundantly prosperous, full of opportunity, with generally good health services, a stable economy, and parliaments that still affirm the Bible before each session? Many have become complacent, beguiled by ungodly ideologies. Our society that grew from its Judaic-Christian roots is now in the throes of accelerated, declining change.

When Jesus said, “As in the days of Noah, so shall it be at the coming of the Son of Man,” he referred to a previous age known by its extreme violence, sexual depravity and social malevolence. Thus, “the Days of Noah” are also synonymous with a great “reset”.

God thus simply flushed away all the wickedness, and through this baptism of water, started again. And, at the brightness of Jesus’ coming, begins another “GREAT RESET”: Return, Reset, Resurrection followed by an age of Righteousness. But all this is preceded by “birth pains”.

So, here’s the question: How are you and I (or our children and grandchildren) ever going to be adequately prepared to face all this yet “unwritten” but certain interim future?

The good news is, that as we abide in Christ and His words are intrinsic to our narrative, our future trajectory is not uncertain. We are victors in Christ!

How does this happen? God prepares and equips us over many years and through all kinds of circumstances, like He has done throughout history. For example, Joseph was prepared through unjust and arduous suffering before he attained the pinnacle of leadership in Egypt. Imagine languishing in prison for many years at the behest of a lying, promiscuous woman!

Likewise, Moses was prepared for his life’s calling, first in the courts of Pharaoh, then in the wilderness for decades, before his life’s mission and purpose became apparent.

David the unknown shepherd boy had his first fights with a lion and then a bear, before embracing a calling to leadership, replete with ensuing battles and many epic struggles.

Jesus equipped and mentored his closest followers for over three years to take on the biggest job of all – in the midst of Roman cruelty and oppression. It’s terrifying to contemplate how many crucifixions those disciples may have witnessed before they saw Jesus go that same fate?

God equips us all before he allows us to step into “future history”. Jesus so many times exhibited a stunningly accurate foretelling of the immediate as well as long-term future. He said to Peter with unwavering confidence: “Satan has asked for you. But I have prayed for you and when you have turned…” the corner in this.

When Jesus called his disciples, he said, “I will make you…” There were no shortcuts to what Jesus had in mind. God knows who we’re becoming, and we need to trust His handiwork. It is the Lord’s work and all is of His making. Gold and silver are refined by fire; Jesus is building His church, and he’s not using sticks and straw. Our part is to remain available and faithful – looking indeed to a future that is gloriously brighter than we may dimly envisage today.

John Classic
By John Classic

Orthodox Fallacy

Are we sure Christianity has “gotten it right” in all its core faith essentials? What about those historical pagan practices now embedded within church culture? This short message may shock a few and is certain to make many uncomfortable, but doesn’t Jesus want us to make those necessary course corrections?

I share this video by way of a deep and lingering concern that we sometimes allow apathy and disregard to prevail when it comes to the accuracy of what we believe and celebrate. Have we not simply taken convenient shortcuts on truth? It’s not that we’ve intended to pave a path other than what the scriptures reveal, but our adherence to long-held traditions can easily veil and limit the truth of Christ. Oh that the reformation of 500 years ago had moved us further out of darkness and deeper into the truth!

Some churches develop their core essentials from a mix including the Bible, their tradition and their unique “apostle” or “prophet” (either living or long deceased). Others denominations give equal equity to the Bible as well as tradition. And yet others testify to adhering to the Bible and the Bible alone; that is, no prophets, apostles or popes, and no tradition that exists outside of the Biblical narrative!

The assertion in this video is really quite confronting as it claims that Christian orthodoxy has lapsed in its ability in basic mathematics. Jesus was dead in the grave for three days and three nights. No more and no less. And this then creates a problem for traditionalists and theologians alike.

As a sincere apologist, let us know whether you think it’s time for an honest rethink, some theological honesty followed by some significant recalibration?

John Classic
By John Classic

Grandmother’s Love

The church fellowships within the Church of God Sabbatarian community are blessed with differing gifts, resources and opportunities. Instead of harbouring an “us and them” mindset, we increasingly embrace this diversity today with profound thankfulness. Across the earth we still call home, we find ourselves “building bridges between brothers” in an ever more uncertain and perverse generation. This increased fraternity and the sharing of resources is a powerful testimony to the work of the Holy Spirit in our midst. Are we not seeing the ministry of reconciliation during our time of stewardship? Praise God!

Perhaps one of the oldest (let’s call her “grandmother”) in our Sabbatarian community is the Church of God (Seventh Day). The past 170 or so years have seen many church families spread out across the world. Many don’t know “grandmother” all that well, but “grandmother” wants you to know that “she’s doing well by God’s grace”. The church internationally is represented in 60 countries, and its members are predominately English and Spanish speaking, the latter formed as strong and vibrant fellowships across the USA, Central and South America.

Ever wondered about the significant growth in the Spanish-speaking churches? Those who read their Santa Biblia (Holy Bible) soon discover that the word for Sabbath is Sabado. In English the seventh day has inherited its Roman naming after the god Saturn. But not so in Spanish. Thus, the day of the week given for rest, worship and fellowship is, of course, Sabado!

So next time you’re out of town, and looking for a place to fellowship, or would simply like to explore our shared church heritage, the love within our “grandmother” church is sure to leave you both blessed and loved. And, if grandmother bids you “paz hermanos” – it’s a special blessing among our Spanish fraternity which simply and profoundly means “peace brethren”.

John Classic
By John Classic

Why all this effort?

We are currently refurbishing our film studio in Western Australia, adding another cinema camera, as well as working on better lighting. By God’s grace and providence, we’ve just uploaded our 631st gospel video.

The cameras we’ve been using in our more recent films has been the Canon EOS 80D, the BMCC 2.5k, and we now have a new BMCC4K on order. This will allow us to film each clip from multiple angles. Over the past 22 years, we’ve used a variety of cameras, including some old VHS cameras, various prosumer cameras including Canon and Sony, as well as a range of DSLRs. But, whether originally written on parchment, or conveyed by digital film, it?s the same timeless message that centres on Jesus Christ.

We?re all aware of the role that media plays in our lives. With the continual roll-out of better and faster technologies throughout the world, and the windows of opportunity that still exist in the free world, whether written on parchment or conveyed in bytes and bits, the follower of Christ has a commission and mandate to share the good news everywhere – to the ends of the earth.

We invite you to partner with us in this labour. Please pray that the LORD of the harvest would call and commission many more disciples, who with fervent vision and Christ-centred identity, embrace with diligence the work of supporting this and other ministries. We need capable media producers, presenters, researchers and those skilled in apologetics who can speak into this generation. We need those who are prepared to sacrifice in the name of Jesus that one more person may hear the good news. More than that, Jesus wants you to step up into his vision.

Someone once asked me, ?Why all this effort into sharing the gospel?? I suppose it?s a fair question, considering the apathy and lack of scriptural integrity that exists in parts of the Christian community. How would you answer? Perhaps mine would be: “Taste and see that the LORD is good!” After all, he is the Bread of Life!

John Klassek,
Producer

Spirit Formed

The Book of Acts, written by Luke, a Greek convert to Christ as well as an adept historian and much-loved doctor, may at first seem to be just an interesting journal documenting the work of those first century apostles.

It is much more than that. Quite simply, the Book of Acts is a testimony to the work of the Holy Spirit. As such, its story is ongoing. Written as a letter some 2000 years ago, Acts give us amazing insights into those apostolic times, introduced with the ascension of Jesus to heaven and the beginning of the church era with the coming of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost.

Faithful men and women were suddenly transformed and empowered from on High. They boldly proclaimed their faith in different languages. The sick were healed. Thousands were baptised. And, deceitful intent revealed. Their new hope and resulting message simply centred on Christ. Thus dawned the church era as we understand it.

The first time, however, where we encounter the work of the Holy Spirit in the scriptures is in the opening verses of Genesis. We read in Genesis chapter 1 and verse 2 that the Spirit of God was moving…

Something powerful happened at creation, resulting in all we know and experience today! Out of that which is not visible, by the power and word of God, time, matter and space were brought into existence. In the beginning [time] God created the heavens [space] and the earth [matter] (Genesis 1:1).

Central to creation was the presence and work of the Holy Spirit.

Throughout the scriptures we gain additional glimpses of the Holy Spirit in the anointing and equipping of faithful people throughout history, especially in the priests and kingly leadership of ancient Israel. One of Israels greatest leaders, King David, at a time of sore repentance and reconciliation, cried out in prayer, Take not your Holy Spirit from me! (Psalm 51:11)

Confronted by his shortcomings against the Holiness of God, at that moment David knew what mattered most. From that point onwards, we see a man further shaped into the righteousness and heart of God.

Perhaps the most intriguing account of the Holy Spirit was in the extraordinary announcement made by the angel Gabriel to the young Jewish woman Mary. The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; therefore the child to be born will be called holythe Son of God. (Luke 1:35)

Joseph, her betrothed, was similarly told the same: Do not fear to take Mary as your wife, for that which is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. (Matthew 1:20)

Thus, the Holy Spirit, introduced to us at creation and existing outside of time, space and matter, entered the created and earthly (our domain framed by time, space and matter), and in the birth of Jesus Christ we witness the two natures of divine and human united. In Christ alone we find heaven and earth intersecting!

No wonder Jesus during his ministry often repeated, The Kingdom of God is near! And therein lies our hopein Jesusand via the transformational journey we experience today. It is this very Holy Spirit, given to those who believe, upon repentance and baptism, that begins in earnest the work of the Kingdom of God, that is, the daily forming of Christ in us.

The apostle Paul expressed his desire for the Holy Spirits work in his letter to the faithful in Galatia, when he penned, until Christ is formed in you! (Galatians 4:19)

The Holy Spirit illuminates, guides, leads, comforts, and teaches. The Holy Spirit also regenerates, prompts, discerns and empowers. Thus, by the indwelling of the Holy Spirit, Gods good work as the Master Potter is being wrought in each of our lives. As a result, the gifts, talents and resources Hes given us are not for our own glory. Rather, in the context of living this dynamic within Church community, the gifts of the Holy Spirit are for the benefit of everyone.

The work of the Holy Spirit in the book of Acts (chapter 10) perhaps illustrates no better than elsewhere Gods reconciling work between heaven and earth as experienced in the lives of Peter and Cornelius. Peter was a Jew, and Cornelius a Roman, regarded by the Jews as an unclean Gentile and therefore treated with contempt. Thus, the two contemporaries lived in a society that regarded them as totally irreconcilable; one represented the promises of God to His people, the other those excluded on the outside.

Then, both separately experienced a vision from God. Both initially were perplexed, but expectant. When they met, Cornelius was overwhelmed, but Peter instantly elevated him as his own. Just like heaven and earth intersecting and uniting in Jesus because of the Holy Spirit, the reconciling work of the Holy Spirit brought these two men, although regarded as opposites in their society, not only to meet, but also embrace each other as brothers.

Where before there was division, now there was peace. Prior to Christ coming, a vast chasm caused by evil and sin existed between heaven and earth. But Jesus, conceived of the Holy Spirit and formed in Marys womb, set in motion the bridging of that chasm.

That which was beyond time, space and matter, entered in a visible waythe express image of the Father as seen and witnessed in Jesus Christ. Thus in Jesus and Jesus alone, we are reconciled to our Heavenly Father.

The power and personal presence of God via the Holy Spirit not only reconciles us to God but also, importantly, to each other. The forming and gifting of the Holy Spirit then empowers and equips us in the context of communitythe body of Christ.

The primary work of the Holy Spirit is to form in us the very image and stature of Jesus Christ, the Son of God. For all humanity, this was typified in Peter and Cornelius experience. The irreconcilable became reconciled. The broken became healed. And the Kingdom of God established in the hearts of men. In the words of scripture, we thus become a new creation. To this Paul says, Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation. The old has passed away; behold, the new has come. (2 Corinthians 5:17)

To be Spirit-formed is to be part of the ongoing work of creation. Without the Holy Spirit, were subject to sin, decay and death. But to live in the Spirit, as scripture says, is life and joy. May the good work of the Holy Spirit continue to transform our lives until that day of resurrection and glory, for which all of creation yearns.

And although our names are written in the Book of Life, the account as told in the Book of Acts, at that day of glory, will also have written our story of being Spirit-formed and reconciled to God and to each other into its final chapter.


By John Klassek